No one wants Scours

Once again my veterinarian science class is filling me full of knowledge and solutions for my family farm. This week our major class discussion was over scours. We also talked about what you can do to treat and prevent them on your operation.

First off for anyone who doesn’t know what scours is; it is:

“Veterinary Pathology: diarrhea in horses and cattle caused by intestinal infection.”

This disease can be detrimental to your heard because calves can pass it to one another quite easy. This infection can be cause by numerous factors; but, the most common are the bacterias E. coli and Salmonella. The calves pass it to one another by their stool. So, scours can spread quickly if you have your cow-calf pairs in a confined area.  The calves do not die directly from this infection but instead from dehydration because their bodies eliminate all the fluids.

The best treatment is to obtain IV access on the calf, then to ensure they are getting enough fluids, give supplemental fluids through the IV. However, this takes a lot of time and will take the most effort. The next best suggestion is to give the correct amount of fluids needed in boluses.  You must be careful though because if you give them too many boluses it will kill the microorganisms in their stomach and in turn the calf will die because the microorganisms cannot break down food. Another thing my teacher pointed out is there is no need to figure out what the cause of scours is because you treat all outbreak cases the same.

The best prevention we talked about in class was the “Sandhills Calving System”. This system consists of separating your dry cows from your cow-calf pairs every week; by putting them in different lots. This ensures that the older calves are not getting the young calves sick. This is a system that takes more effort but you should have fewer problems in the long run.

Let me know if you have any pointers on scours and the treatment/prevention in the comments below.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/scour

http://www.beefusa.org/Udocs/PR103-SandhillsCalvingSystem.pdf

Branding, Yes or No?

Well, once again my classes are going hand and hand. Today, in class, we talked about animal welfare while talking about branding and the laws that apply to it in my veterinarian science. I am going to stick to the branding side while throwing bits of information about the welfare of the livestock.

First the branding has become much more of a controversy for the livestock industry. eid-tag Some say it hurts the animal and is just plain wrong to be doing in this day and age. These same people would make that argument that these are out dated was of identifying cattle. While also pointing out that there are more “humane” was of identification such as ear tags or paint branding. But both of these types of branding are only temporary.

The people who are for it would make the case they need a permanent mark to cattle_fire_3ensure they know which cattle belong to them. Or they would make the case that their farm has used that same brand for decades and they do not want to change it. Either way they are for branding and it has not been outlawed yet. So, therefore they are still allowed to brand as long as they want.

There are regulations on branding in Missouri such as:

Must be on the shoulder, rib or hip of either the right or left side

Cannot use the same brand unless it has been out of circulation for 5 years

Must be 3 “ in diameter 

 Must be registered

There are also more laws dealing with branding you can find them for Missouri at http://mda.mo.gov/animals/livestockbranding.php

There are always two sides two every battle and I am not one to tell another man what he can and can’t   do with his property. We do not do this on my family farm so I would love to hear what farmers who do brand have to say about it.

Let me know, and comment below!